Range 15 review Zombie Education Alliance

Range 15 review

Street Justice Films declares war on the living dead in their military zombedy Range 15.

Range 15 shoots for a hit, but misses widely.

by TS Alan
(2016, USA)

Range 15 review Zombie Education AllianceA group of veterans wake up in jail after a night of partying and stupidity to find out that the zombie apocalypse has spread across the United States, which to them is a Godsend for it gives them a new purpose in life—killing zombies and the occasional living. Together, they set out to get to a military safe haven before it’s too late. Along the way they discover they have a cure, a home brewed batch of whiskey made with viper semen.

If this zombie comedy adventure sounds like a military version of The Hangover, it’s not. It’s actually not a lot of things, especially funny. Most of the sight gags are juvenile and uninspired; the dialogue relies heavily on bad, tasteless jokes with a multitude of homosexual references, which raises the question whether the actors and writers are actual homophobes or making fun of homophobes. The film breaks the fourth wall on several occasions, which would be fine if the moments were actually humorous but they’re not.

There is also a lot of filler in this movie to accommodate the plethora of guest shots, including William Shatner, Danny Trejo, Sean Astin, Ron Jeremy, Marcus Lutterel and Randy Couture (who’s not listed in the film’s IMDB credits), most of which are only mildly amusing, though I did enjoy the helicopter scene with Astin.

There are a few moments were the acting excels beyond the horrible (excluding Shatner and Astin), and those moments come with veteran actor Keith David (Community, Enlisted) as Colonel Holloway. Also Rachel Hardisty, who’s a newcomer gets some amusing moments as Rocco’s Zombie. But those moments are too few and far between to make up for the rest of the film.

Range 15 review Zombie Education Alliance

This is a moronic, uninspired journey of a group of idiotic and unlikable characters that have no redeeming qualities, and who you will have no emotional attachment to. It is a film that was made by veterans geared toward veterans, and for the narrow target audience one wonders how they plan on recouping the $1,000,000 it took to make the film; though much of the funding was raised through Indiegogo sponsorship, of which all of the major donor companies get shameless product placement on purpose.

In summary: The acting was horrible, the plot thin, the direction poor, the jokes tasteless and raunchy, the gags juvenile and the film tries too hard to be funny. The film is a funny as inflamed and bleeding hemorrhoids but if you’re into those kinds of films then its perfect for you. For those who are not, you’ll want to pass on this film.

As a side note: For a film made by veterans, why during the “A Soldier Comes Home” vignette were the US flags on the front porch improperly displayed? Whether in the horizontal or vertical orientation against a wall, the union (stars) should be uppermost and to the observer’s left. They were not. Shame on you.

Range 15
Directed by Ross Patterson
Written by Billy Jay, Nick Palmisciano and Ross Patterson
Cast: Keith David, Mindy Robinson, Ross Patterson, Gene Vandenham, Mat Best, Bryan Callen, Lindsay Lamb and Rachel Hardisty.
Run Time: 89 minutes
Release Date: June 15. Limited theatrical release and streaming in HD.

Street Justice Films declares war on the living dead in their military zombedy Range 15. Range 15 shoots for a hit, but misses widely. by TS Alan (2016, USA) A group of veterans wake up in jail after a night of partying and stupidity to find out that the zombie apocalypse has spread across the United States, which to them is a Godsend for it gives them a new purpose in life—killing zombies and the occasional living. Together, they set out to get to a military safe haven before it's too late. Along the way they discover they have a…

Review Overview

1 Out of 5 Stars

F

Summary : Bad script, bad acting, bad direction, uninspired and not funny. Add to the mix tasteless jokes and juvenile gags that do not amuse and you have a zombie comedy called Range 15.

About TS Alan

TS was the former managing editor of Zombie Training before co-founding ZEA with former associate editor Mike Garman. TS was born outside Buffalo, NY. After attending high school he entered into a two-year community college to study Communications and Media Arts. There he became involved in the college’s radio station as a radio personality, under the pseudonym of J.D. Hollywood. After a year with WNCB radio he also became the station’s Promotions Director. J.D. Hollywood was also one of two names he used as a music reporter and Associate Editor for Buffalo Backstage, a local music magazine. After moving to Manhattan and experiencing the Northeast blackout of 2003, he became interested in prepping and urban survival, learning much of his experience through self education and observation of tragic events like 9/11 and Hurricane Sandy. TS Alan currently resides in the East Village of New York City and is a published author of the zombie novel The Romero Strain.